About Us

Who we are?

Falcone Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, P. C. is located in Hazleton, Pennsylvania. Dr. Frank Falcone, Jr. provides his expertise as a Board certified Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon and has a fellowship in TMJ and Facial Cosmetic Surgery.
To learn more about Dr. Falcone's practice, his credentials, and the services provided at Falcone Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, P. C., please see the pages highlighted on this page.

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Thank you for visiting the website of Dr. Frank Falcone, Jr.. This site contains important information about my practice and the specialty of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. Our office is dedicated to providing you with the most modern and highest quality care possible. Our goal is to make your visit to the oral and maxillofacial surgeon a pleasant experience.

You may ask, "What is Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, anyway?" The American Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery defines my specialty as, "The art and science of diagnosis, surgical and related treatment of diseases, injuries, defects, and esthetic aspects of the oral and maxillofacial area." The word "maxillofacial" refers to the jaws and face. Patients come to an Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon (OMS) for a wide variety of problems. (Please see sidebar at left for a list of common problems that we treat.)

Becoming an oral and maxillofacial surgeon is extremely arduous. Oral and maxillofacial surgeons first must attend four years of college. Then, four more years of schooling is necessary to obtain a doctoral degree. After that, an oral and maxillofacial surgeon is trained for another four to six years in a hospital-based oral and maxillofacial surgery residency program. An oral and maxillofacial surgeon spends a significant amount of time rotating through medically related fields such as internal medicine, general and trauma surgery, anesthesiology, otolaryngology and plastic and reconstructive surgery. In addition, an OMS rotates through emergency medicine; critical care medicine, head and neck surgery and even neurosurgery. A certificate to practice oral and maxillofacial surgery is awarded after successful completion of this type of residency program. Dr. Falcone has also completed a yearlong Fellowship in Facial Cosmetic and Temporomandibular Joint Surgery after the completion of his residency.

Our office is located in the Medical Arts Complex, 668 North Church Street, Suite 10, Hazleton, Pennsylvania, 18201. It is a convenient location, across the street from the former Hazleton-St. Joseph Medical Center. It is accessible from all of the major highways in Northeast Pennsylvania. (Find Us)

Most procedures can be done safely and comfortably in our office. However, if your case is extensive or complicated, Dr. Falcone maintains staff privileges at Hazleton General Hospital.

We strive to provide you with the most advanced and up to date surgical procedures to treat all of your oral and maxillofacial surgery needs. Please feel free to navigate this web site to obtain further information about our practice and the procedures that we offer.

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Dr. Falcone was graduated from Morristown High School in Morristown, New Jersey. He then attended Hamilton College in Clinton, New York, earning a Bachelor of Arts degree. He was awarded a Doctor of Dental Medicine (D.M.D.) degree from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey in 1990 and completed a four-year residency in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at the State of New York Health Science Center at Brooklyn/ Kings County Hospital Center, receiving his certificate in 1994. During the final year of his residency, he served as chief resident in oral and maxillofacial surgery at Kings County Hospital Center, Downstate Medical Center, Maimonides Medical Center, and Coney Island Hospital. all of which are in Brooklyn, New York.

In June 1995, Dr. Falcone completed a postdoctoral fellowship in Facial Cosmetic and Temporomandibular Joint Surgery sponsored by the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. Part of the yearlong fellowship program was spent in South America, first in Colombia with “Healing the Children” on a medical mission to treat cleft lip and palate anomalies. Later, in Caracas, Venezuela, Dr. Falcone performed surgery for patients with dentofacial and cranio facial deformities. The remainder of the year was spent performing temporomandibular joint surgery at Staten Island Hospital in New York for four months and facial cosmetic and otolaryngology surgery at Morristown Memorial Hospital in Morristown, New Jersey, for three months.

Dr. Falcone was board certified in March 1996 by the American Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and has achieved Diplomate status. He was also re-certified by the American Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery in November 2004; passing the mandatory re-certification examination, which is required every 8 to10 years. Subsequently, Dr. Falcone became a Diplomate of the National Dental Board of Anesthesiology in March of 2005 by successfully completing their challenging certification examination. In addition, Dr. Falcone is a former Clinical Instructor and Attending Surgeon at the State of New York Health Science Center at Brooklyn / Kings County Hospital Center, where he taught Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery residents the most technologically advanced surgical techniques. He was also a mock board examiner for the Metropolitan New York Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Residency Programs to better prepare these residents for their board certification exams.

The Pennsylvania Society of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons have appointed Dr. Falcone (in conjunction with the Pennsylvania State Board of Dentistry) as an Office Anesthesia Evaluator. He inspects dental offices that provide anesthesia (oral sedation, IV sedation, nitrous oxide and general anesthesia) to their patients, to make sure the proper standards of care are followed. He is a Fellow of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, American Dental Society of Anesthesiology, as well as the American College of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. In addition, Dr. Falcone is a member of the Pennsylvania Society of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons and the International Congress of Oral Implantologists.

Dr. Falcone has been a member of our medical community since 1996, practicing oral and maxillofacial surgery at Falcone Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, P.C. here in Hazleton, PA. He holds a staff appointment at Hazleton General Hospital. His wife, Linda Rocanelli, is also a member of our medical community. She is a Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist (CRNA) employed by Falcone Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, P.C. and Somnia Anesthesia, Inc.. Ms. Rocanelli provides anesthesia services at Hazleton General Hospital and Dr. Falcone's office. Dr. Falcone and Ms. Rocanelli have made a commitment to provide quality medical care in the Greater Hazleton area as well as all of Northeast Pennsylvania.

Here are some of the services provided by Falcone Oral & Maxilofacial Surgery:

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  • Dental extractions
  • Wisdom tooth consults and extractions
  • Dental implant placement
  • Preparation of jaws for dentures (alveoloplasty and preprosthetic surgery)
  • General anesthesia
  • Intravenous sedation
  • Nitrous Oxide ("laughing gas")
  • Oral sedation
  • Removal of face and jaw pathology
  • Exposure of impacted teeth for braces
  • Removal of hyperplastic muscle attachments (frenectomy)
  • Correction of failed root canal treatment (apicoectomy or surgical root canal)
  • Crown lengthening and other periodontal surgery
  • Bone grafts and jaw ridge augmentation
  • Soft tissue grafting around teeth and implants for aesthetics
  • TMJ treatment (surgical and non-surgical therapy)
  • Face and jaw reconstructive surgery
  • Surgery to correct dentofacial deformities (orthognathic surgery)
  • Cosmetic face and jaw surgery
  • Cleft lip and palate surgery
  • Treatment of dental and facial infections
  • Treatment of traumatic injuries to the face, mouth or jaws
  • And much more

Most procedures can be done safely and comfortably in our office. However, if your case is extensive or complicated, Dr. Falcone maintains staff privileges at Hazleton General Hospital.

We strive to provide you with the most advanced and up to date surgical procedures to treat all of your oral and maxillofacial surgery needs. Please feel free to navigate this web site to obtain further information about some of the specific procedures that we offer.

What a great surgeon! The best around! (John T.)

Dr. Falcone is one of the most respectable professionals that I have ever met since moving to Pennsylvania. He is highly trained and extremely skilled. I had surgery at his office and didn't even know I had anything done. His staff is super! His sedation was marvelous! I refer all my friends and family to his office. What a no nonsense, caring and kind professional. I would never go anywhere else to have my oral surgery. I can't believe someone had a problem with him. That person must be crazy! If you need any type of oral surgery, don't hesitate to call his office. You won't be disappointed!!

Unbelievable oral surgeon! (Mildred F.)

I would never go anywhere else. He is so caring and so skilled. He made me feel like a million dollars. Do yourself a favor, if you need wisdom teeth removed, a tooth extracted or a dental implant placed, DON'T EVEN THINK ABOUT GOING ANYWHERE ELSE! You get New York City type care at Hazleton, PA prices. What a great surgeon and what a bargain!

The best oral surgeon in NEPA!! (Linda S.)

Dr. Falcone is the absolute best oral and maxillofacial surgeon in Northeastern Pennsylvania. He is considerate and caring and speaks to patient's as if they were his own family. His surgical technique is fabulous and his sedation was great! I had teeth pulled, bone grafting and implants and things are wonderful. I can eat again. I would definitely refer anyone to him!!!! I have been other places, but never got the degree of kindness and courteousness anywhere else. Put your faith in him, he is the best!

From time to time Dr. Falcone has the opportunity to be interviewed in the newspaper and on local television regarding his work as an Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon. We hope you will enjoy the topics of special interest as seen in the pictures and video on this page as well as the featured article links in the sidebar. You can also keep up with Dr. Falcone on facebook!

June 2009- Wish Upon a Hero Foundation Dr. Falcone for donating his services to a man in need of oral health care.

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March 2007 - Dr. Falcone participated in a panel discussion on WVIA's "CALL THE DOCTOR" show featuring the topic Cosmetic Surgery: Creating the Perfect Smile.

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NOTICE TO WEB SITE BROWSERS:

This website is provided for information and education purposes only. No doctor/patient relationship is established by your use of this site. No diagnosis or treatment is being provided.

The information contained here should be used in consultation with a surgeon of your choice. No guarantees or warranties are made regarding any of the information contained within this website. This website is not intended to offer specific medical or surgical advice to anyone.

Dr. Falcone is licensed to practice in the state of Pennsylvania.

This website and Dr. Falcone take no responsibility for websites hyper-linked to this site and such hyper-linking does not imply any relationships or endorsements of the linked sites.


FALCONE ORAL & MAXILLOFACIAL SURGERY, P.C.
Medical Arts Complex
668 North Church Street
Suite 10
Hazleton, PA 18201

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OMS Procedures

Here are some of the services provided by Falcone Oral & Maxilofacial Surgery

Our main services

Tooth Removal

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Sometimes oral diseases make it such that your dentist or oral and maxillofacial surgeon cannot save a tooth. On other occasions, time, effort, economics, insurance and other factors make it necessary to remove a tooth to maintain good oral health. The surgical term to describe removal of a tooth is extraction. There are many different types of extractions done daily in the oral and maxillofacial surgeon’s office. Dr. Falcone is an expert at removal of all types of teeth. He performs this surgery thousands of times a year in his office.

Tooth removal is the most common surgery that oral and maxillofacial surgeons such as Dr. Falcone perform. Extractions can routinely be performed quickly, painlessly and with minimal post-operative discomfort in an oral and maxillofacial surgeon’s office. Dr. Falcone caters to patients with anxiety over this type of surgery.

Extraction of teeth can be performed with local anesthesia only (novocaine) or with other modalities for pain and anxiety control such as oral sedation, nitrous oxide (laughing gas) as well as intravenous sedation and general anesthesia.

Dr. Falcone can also advise you what can be done once a tooth has been extracted. Additional procedures can be performed to help you maintain that fantastic smile. Dental implants are just one of the options available to keep you smiling and chewing your food efficiently.

If you have any questions, call our office and Dr. Falcone and his staff will be happy to answer any concerns that you may have.

There have been many advances in tooth removal over the past few years. Dr. Falcone attends continuing education each year to provide his patients with the most technologically advanced surgical techniques possible. Come and see why patients and colleagues of Dr. Falcone regard him as one of the best oral and maxillofacial surgeons in Northeast Pennsylvania.

A consultation is only a phone call away! (570) 455-5889

Wisdoom Tooth Consults and Extractions

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Wisdom teeth (your third molars) are the last teeth to come in and the last ones needed for good oral health. They may not ever erupt, or emerge from your gums until your late teens or early twenties, if they erupt at all. Most often, they are impacted, or trapped in the jawbone and gums, usually because there is not enough room for them in your mouth.

Silent and serious problems can develop from impacted or partially trapped wisdom teeth. Infections as well as damage to nearby teeth can occur. Crowding and shifting of teeth in parts of the jaws is possible. In addition, since the area of wisdom teeth is difficult to correctly clean, tooth decay and periodontal (gum) problems are prevalent in the wisdom teeth as well as your second (12 year) molars.

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More serious complications can arise when the dental sac that surrounds an impacted tooth fills with fluid and enlarges to form a cyst in the jawbone. Cysts can destroy good bone and cause permanent damage to the adjacent teeth, jawbone and nerves. If left untreated, tumors can develop from the area of these cysts and a more extensive surgical procedure would be required to remove the teeth and associated tumor.

Most recently, it has been discovered that the bacteria that collects around your 3rd molars invade the bloodstream and can lead to clogging of the arteries around the heart. The clogged arteries are what causes heart attacks. This bacteria also can lead to strokes and diabetes. For more information please read the AAOMS 3rd Molar Study.

Even though you may not be experiencing any problems from your wisdom teeth, it is likely that they will cause problems for you in the future. No one can tell you when your wisdom teeth will cause trouble, but when they do, the circumstances can be much more painful and the teeth may be more complicated to properly treat. We recommend in most cases that you have your wisdom teeth evaluated by an oral and maxillofacial surgeon like Dr. Falcone between the ages 16-18. However, it is never too early or late to have your wisdom teeth examined. Certainly, if you are experiencing discomfort now or are unsure of the position of your wisdom teeth it may be prudent to schedule an appointment with Dr. Falcone soon.

There have been many advances in tooth removal over the past few years. Dr. Falcone attends continuing education each year to provide his patients with the most technologically advanced surgical techniques possible. Come and see why patients and colleagues of Dr. Falcone regard him as one of the best oral and maxillofacial surgeons in Northeast Pennsylvania.

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Dr. Falcone can frequently predict through the use of x-rays and clinical examination when or if your wisdom teeth might begin to cause you problems in the near future or later in life. If your oral evaluation reveals a problem or a potential problem with your wisdom teeth, Dr. Falcone will most likely recommend their removal rather than wait for trouble to start. Surgical removal is easier in younger patients, as roots are not yet fully developed. It is for this reason that a decision may be made to remove wisdom teeth prior to any discomfort or complications. This method of treatment will avoid comp- lications later in life.

Although all surgery is serious and should be decided on carefully, modern oral and maxillofacial surgery has been greatly improved in the past several years. Many steps are taken to ensure your comfort before, during and after your procedure. Generally, you will experience some minor swelling and discomfort after your surgery. However, with personalized postoperative care given by Dr. Falcone and his staff, these inconveniences are greatly minimized.

The doctor and his staff are always available to answer any questions or discus your personal situation.

We are happy to be of service to you!

Pain & Anxiety Control (Anesthesia)

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Our goal is to provide every patient with high-quality oral and maxillofacial surgery care. We wish to make your visit as safe and comfortable as possible. Dr. Falcone is not only a specialist in treating problems of the mouth, teeth and jaws, but also is experienced in dealing with the control of pain and anxiety. Modern technology makes it manageable to perform complicated surgical procedures in the office with little or no discomfort.

During his residency and fellowship, Dr. Falcone received extensive training in the medical and dental aspects of anesthesia. He holds a special permit, which is required to administer anesthesia in the state of Pennsylvania. In addition, his office has been inspected and has state of the art monitoring equipment.

Dr. Falcone has the ability to handle emergency situations as well as having specific emergency medications and equipment that is mandatory for safe anesthesia delivery. Dr. Falcone and his staff are trained in CPR, Advanced Cardiac Life Support and Pediatric Advanced Life Support.

In our effort to make your surgical experience as pleasant and stress free as possible, as well as to maintain the highest level of safety, we employ a certified registered nurse anesthetist to assist Dr. Falcone in the delivery of anesthesia. Linda Rocanelli, CRNA has over 20 years of anesthesia expertise and has given thousands of intravenous sedations and general anesthetics over that time period. She is also employed at Hazleton General Hospital as a staff nurse anesthetist and maintains the penultimate standard of care for office outpatient anesthesia.

Anesthesia in our office as an outpatient can take place in many different forms. 1. Local Anesthesia (Novocaine) 2. Local Anesthesia with oral sedation (Oral Valium Sedation) 3. Local Anesthesia with Nitrous Oxide (Laughing Gas) 4. Local Anesthesia with Intravenous Sedation (Conscious Sedation, Deep Sedation, Twilight Sleep) 5. General Anesthesia (Fully Asleep with a breathing tube) can also be performed but is not usually necessary. If general anesthesia is required for your procedure, it may be done in a hospital setting as an outpatient or inpatient depending on your personal circumstances.

Dr. Falcone and his staff have the knowledge and expertise to make your surgical and anesthetic experience pleasant, safe and extremely comfortable and are always happy to answer any questions that you might have.

Dental Implants

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Did you know that approximately 40 million Americans have lost one or more of their permanent teeth? This accounts for about one-half of the adult population over the age of 55! People are now living longer and enjoying more active lives and those who lose their teeth at an early age can face 30 to 40 years of wearing dentures. This can cause serious health and nutritional problems, especially for older people.

Are you self-conscious about your smile? Are you worried that others may see the problems in your mouth? Do you tend to avoid laughing in front of others and eating certain foods you enjoy because you have a loose denture? Do you feel that you look older than your age because you have a sunken-in facial appearance due to tooth loss? If so, you may wish to consider dental implants.

Dental implants are permanent tooth root substitutes, which provide an anchor for artificial replacement teeth, dentures or bridges. They are made from a space age metal called titanium, which is compatible with human bone and tissue. These titanium cylinders are placed directly into the jawbone where teeth are missing. Later, small posts called abutments are attached to the implants. These posts protrude through the gums and provide anchorage for artificial teeth.

WHO CAN HAVE DENTAL IMPLANTS?

Just about anyone is a candidate for dental implants! If you are healthy enough to have a tooth extracted, you are probably healthy enough to have dental implant placement. Dr. Falcone can help you to make the determination if implants are right for you. A thorough evaluation is necessary prior to dental implant placement. Dr. Falcone and your restorative dentist will evaluate your specific needs by performing the following: 1. Dental and medical health assessment 2. Lifestyle assessment 3. Oral hygiene assessment 4. Radiographic evaluation 5. Evaluation of available jawbone 6. Surgical and restorative examination

If you feel that dental implants are right for you, we will work closely with you to formulate a treatment plan, which will satisfy your needs and works within your budget. After your initial implant consultation, we can discuss fees and insurance reimbursement. Insurance coverage for implant procedures is varied, but we will be happy to assist you in obtaining the benefits to which you are entitled.

Sometimes patients may require adjunctive procedures prior to implant placement, or in conjunction to implant placement due to a lack of sufficient bone for implant placement. In certain cases, bone-grafting procedures may be indicated to restore bone that has been lost. Also, sinus-lifting procedures may be required if the sinus cavity is too low. Dr. Falcone will thoroughly discuss these items at your consultation visit along with any risks for these types of procedures.

Most times, dental implant surgery is performed in Dr. Falcone’s office. In some cases, implants are done in the hospital or an ambulatory surgical center. In any event, implants can be placed with local anesthesia or some form of sedation depending on your personal needs.

Surgical Root Canal (Apicoectomy)

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Although conventional root canal therapy is approximately 90 percent successful when performed by a general dentist or endodontist (root canal specialist), there are certain instances when this is not possible or not indicated. A surgical root canal can be considered when conventional root canal therapy has failed or cannot be performed.

Surgical root canals are also called apicoectomies by the dental profession. They can also be referred to as surgical endodontic procedures.

There are many indications for surgical root canals, which include:

Inability to eliminate a pathologic process with conventional root canal therapy. This may include the need to remove cysts, granulation tissue or infection.

Root fractures

Root perforations

Recurrent pain and infections

Pathology that cannot be removed because it is impossible to clean and fill the root canal from a routine approach. Examples of this include teeth with severe root curvatures, calcified root canals, and teeth that have posts and caps placed.

Correction of a treatment failure or a procedural accident such as broken instruments, incomplete root canal filling or lack of adequate root canal seal.

Unfortunately, not every problem of this nature can be treated with surgical root canal. A consultation visit with Dr. Falcone is necessary to determine what type of treatment is best for you. He will also discuss treatment alternatives such as extraction, dental implants and other modalities to help correct your dental problems when conventional root canal therapy fails.

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The surgery itself can take many different forms; however, it usually consists of the following: 1. Exploration of the root end of the affected tooth and jaw. 2. Removal of pathologic lesions or infection in the area. 3. Removal of 2-3 millimeters of the root end of the affected tooth to allow for preparation of the root to seal it to prevent future problems. 4. Retrograde filling (retroseal) in the prepared root end to seal it. 5. In most cases bone graft material can be placed to help restore the affected jaw to its original condition.

Dr. Falcone will discuss your surgery in detail at your consultation visit. He is always happy to answer any questions that you may have. So if you have a problem requiring an evaluation regarding surgical root canal, do not hesitate to call for an appointment.

Oral Lesions and Cancer

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Did you know that oral and throat cancer accounts for 2-3 percent of all cancer deaths in the United States? Every year more than 30,000 people in the U.S. find out that they have oral and/or throat cancer.

Cancer is a group of many diseases and happens when tissue cells become abnormal and reproduce without control or order. More than 100 types of cancer have been recorded. Tissue cells that reproduce when they are not needed form too much tissue. This extra mass of tissue is called a tumor. Tumors can be benign or malignant. A benign tumor is not cancerous and usually does not spread. They are not a threat to life. A malignant tumor is cancerous. These types of tumors are extremely harmful and can invade all body parts and spread to other parts of the body.

Cancerous lesions are only one type of lesion that affects the mouth, jaws, head and neck. There are many other sores that can affect these areas and are quite common. Cysts (fluid filled lesions) are prevalent and can only be detected by clinical exam and x-rays. It is extremely important that you see your general dentist at least 2 times a year to make sure that you do not have any of these types of problems. Early detection of cysts, tumors and other lesions of the mouth, lips, jaws, head and neck is essential because treatment works best before these diseases spread.

Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons like Dr. Falcone treat diseases of the mouth, lips, jaws, head and neck every day. He recommends that if you are a high-risk patient for cancer or other lesions, you be seen once a year by an oral and maxillofacial surgeon for evaluation. Dr. Falcone also recommends that you do self-examination at least once a month. He can show you how to do this when you come to his office for examination.

You may ask, “How do I know if I am a high risk person?” Research has shown that there are a number of factors that contribute to development of oral, lip, throat, jaw, head or neck lesions. The most common factors include the use of tobacco and alcohol. Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) has now also been implicated in causing oral and head and neck cancer. Other factors include poor mouth hygiene, irritation caused by ill-fitting dentures, rough surfaces on teeth, poor nutrition, exposure to sunlight, or a combination of the above. Those at an especially high risk are males over the age of 40 who are combination heavy drinkers and smokers, or users of smokeless tobacco. Remember that even if you do not have teeth and wear dentures, it is still very important to see your general dentist or oral and maxillofacial surgeon once a year!

Dr. Falcone recommends that if you see the following problems start to occur in your mouth; schedule an appointment for evaluation. 1. Reddish patches 2. Whitish patches 3. A sore that fails to heal or bleeds easily 4. A lump or thickening of the tissues 5. Chronic sore throat or hoarseness 6. Difficulty in chewing or swallowing

If Dr. Falcone feels that something looks suspicious, a biopsy may be recommended. A biopsy procedure involves the removal of the suspicious lesion or a portion of the lesion. This tissue is then sent to the pathology laboratory to be examined microscopically so that an accurate diagnosis of the problem can be made. The biopsy report not only helps Dr. Falcone establish a diagnosis, but also allows him to make a treatment plan specifically designed for you and the type of lesion diagnosed.

Self-examination is one of the ways to help your general dentist and oral and maxillofacial surgeon detect oral, jaw, lip, head and neck lesions. To complete an oral and head and neck self-examination use a bright light and a mirror and do the following:

1. Look at your face, lips, ears, scalp, nose and neck and note any cuts, sores, lumps or bumps. Use an additional mirror to look in hard to reach areas such as the top of your head and behind your ears. 2. Remove your dentures. 3. Look at and feel the insides of your lips and the front of your gums. 4. Tilt your head back or use an additional mirror (compact mirror) to look at and feel the roof of your mouth. 5. Pull out your cheeks to see the inside of them and also to see the back gums. 6. Pull out your tongue and inspect all sides of it. 7. Feel for lumps, bumps or enlarged lymph nodes (glands) in both sides of your neck and underneath the lower jaw.

Remember that this exam is not a substitute for a yearly check-up by your dentist or oral and maxillofacial surgeon. Please do not ignore any suspicious lumps, bumps or sores. If you discover something, make an appointment with Dr. Falcone for a prompt examination. Early treatment may well be the key to a fast and complete recovery.

Denture Fit & Comfort

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Over 32 million Americans today do not have teeth and wear dentures. The majority of these people have problems with their existing dentures. This could be the case for many reasons. It is possible that their jaws were not properly prepared for dentures when their teeth were removed or that shrinkage of the jaws has occurred.

If you are one of these people, you may be having a difficult time trying to cope with some of the negative side effects such as slipping of your denture, sore spots, lack of denture stability and decreased confidence. Your poor denture fit could be decreasing your quality of life.

Advances in surgical procedures and materials now allow Dr. Falcone to help provide you with better fitting denture that will allow you to eat, speak and smile without you worrying about slipping or uncomfortable dentures. Many treatment options exist to help you have a better fitting denture.

The term used to prepare jaws for dentures is Preprosthetic Surgery.

Preservation and restoration of your jaws starts at the time when your teeth are extracted. Bone and soft tissue grafting techniques can be done at the time your teeth are removed to decrease or prevent loss of jawbone under your dentures.

If you are just concerned with having your teeth removed and wearing dentures, your jaws may require alveoloplasty. An alveoloplasty is a procedure where Dr. Falcone trims any sharp bony edges of your upper or lower jaw to allow for denture comfort. In addition, if you have undercuts of bone in your jaws, they should be removed.

Many times when teeth are lost lumps of bone and tissue form and need to be trimmed before dentures are made. Terms for these lumps include but are not limited to mandibular tori, maxillary torus, bony exostosis, and overgrown maxillary tuberosity. The term epulis fissuratum is used to define folds of overgrown tissue that result from dentures that do not fit properly. These folds as well as other types of overgrown tissue and large muscle attachments called frenums require removal to ensure proper fitting dentures.

Many people stop going to see their general dentist once they have had dentures made. This is a mistake because regular check-ups are still the best way to make sure that your mouth is healthy. Changes in your gums and jawbone readily occur under your dentures and may not be apparent to you. Dr. Falcone recommends that if you have no teeth and are wearing full upper and lower dentures that you see your general dentist or oral and maxillofacial surgeon every year to make sure that no problems are evident.

If you have had shrinkage of you jawbones and your denture is slipping there are many treatment options available to help you. Dental implants can be used to help anchor a loose denture. Your own bone or bone substitutes (synthetic bone) can be used to build up your jawbones. Depending on the amount of shrinkage, these types of treatment can sometimes be performed in the office. Dr. Falcone may recommend that a vestibuloplasty be performed. If enough jawbone is evident below the muscle attachments of the lip, cheeks and tongue, firm tissue can be taken from the roof of your mouth. can also be used with no donor site necessary, or lateral thigh to graft over your jawbone to provide a larger denture ridge so that your dentures will be better stabilized.

Remember, the only way that Dr. Falcone or your general dentist can recognize potential problems is if you schedule regular appointments. There are multiple methods to help you with your denture or jawbone difficulties.

Dr. Falcone is eager to discuss them with you and recommend a customized treatment plan to restore your confidence, smile and to improve your quality of life.

TMJ Disorders

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The Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) is the small joint located in front of your ear where your skull and your lower jaw meet. This joint allows your lower jaw (mandible) to move so that you can talk, yawn and chew.

If you place your fingers just in front of your ears and open your mouth, you can feel each of these joints on the left and right sides of your head. These two joints function together and are quite flexible. Muscles and ligaments attach to and surround these joints and control their position and movement.

Temporomandibular joint disorders fall into three main categories: 1. Internal derangement of the joint (dislocated jaw, displaced TMJ disc, condylar process injury of the lower jaw). 2. Degenerative joint disease (osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, perforated TMJ disc). 3. Myofascial pain disorders (pain and discomfort in the muscles around the jaw joints, neck and shoulder that can cause dysfunction).

Myofascial pain is the most common disorder of the TMJ. In addition, people may have a combination of the conditions listed above.

There are many different factors that can cause temporo-mandibular disorders, sometimes a mixture of many problems contribute to this disease. Trauma, such as a blow to the TMJ or head can cause damage to the area causing pain and locking of the jaw joints. This type of injury can also cause arthritis of the joint. Some authorities believe that a poor bite can cause TMJ problems. Others feel that stress, either physical or mental, may cause or aggravate TMJ disorders. People with temporomandibular disorders often clench or grind their teeth which can fatigue jaw musculature and cause pain. Since there are so many factors that contribute to TMJ disorders, diagnosis is complex and sometimes may require multiple diagnostic procedures. It is important to properly determine the cause of TMJ problems because treatment is guided based on that cause.

You may wonder, "How do I know if I have a TMJ disorder?" Dr. Falcone can determine if there is dysfunction in your joints during a detailed TMJ examination. As a specialist in the areas of the mouth, jaws and teeth, Dr. Falcone is in a great position to diagnose your problem.

Some of the symptoms of TMJ disorders may include one or more of the following: 1. Limited movement of your jaw. 2. Locking of your jaw. 3. Painful clicking, popping or grating sounds in your jaw joints upon opening or closing. 4. A sudden change in your bite. 5. Grinding or clenching your teeth. 6. Frequent headaches, neck aches or muscle tightness around your jaws. 7. Sore, stiff muscles around your jaw, especially upon waking. 8. Multiple dislocations of your jaw joint, especially when you yawn. 9. Earaches and dizziness can also be related to temporomandibular disorders at times.

Remember that occasional discomfort in the jaw joints or chewing muscles is common and usually not a cause for concern, only your oral and maxillofacial surgeon can know for sure

Most of the time, temporomandibular disorders are temporary and do not progressively worsen. Therefore, simple treatment is usually all that is necessary to relieve your discomfort.

Sometimes, however, more invasive therapy is needed. Dr. Falcone will recommend a treatment plan that is right for you when he sees you for an examination and will be happy to discuss all of your treatment options with you.

If you have any other concerns about TMJ dysfunction and disorders, feel free to contact our office.

Help is only a phone call away!

Salivary Gland Disorders

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There are two types of salivary glands, major and minor, both that may cause problems. The minor salivary glands are found in most areas of the mouth. The major salivary glands are paired structures and are called the parotid, submandibular and sublingual glands.

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Many people complain that they have a dry mouth. This is known as xerostomia. This is one of the myriad of problems that can occur when your saliva glands do not function properly. Xerostomia can also be caused by problems other than disorders of the salivary glands such as prescription medications for other health problems. Dr. Falcone can help identify and treat these problems medically and surgically.

Salivary stones (sialoliths) can form in the salivary gland ducts, which can decrease or block salivary flow. If left untreated, this obstruction can cause acute pain, swelling and infection. Many times salivary stones will require surgical removal. Sometimes the affected salivary gland will require removal, also.

Salivary ducts especially those of the sublingual gland and minor salivary glands are frequently traumatized and injured beneath the surface mucosa. Saliva and mucous that is produced by these glands can then pool and accumulate beneath the surface mucosa within the soft tissues of the mouth. Pseudocysts are then formed. These are called mucoceles, sialoceles, or ranulas depending on their type and location. Surgical intervention is needed to correct these types of problems.

Salivary glands themselves can be subject to pathologic lesions and cancer in some instances. If you are experiencing any of the above symptoms or other problems with your salivary glands, Dr. Falcone can advise the proper course of therapy. Delay in treatment can cause significant injury, so do not wait until it is too late. Call us for an appointment today!

Facial Trauma

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One of the most frightening types of injuries is an injury to the face. Frightening because of the dangerous nature of any trauma to the head, and frightening because of the possibility of long-lasting complications.

One thing you should know is that if you ever encounter a serious injury like this is that there are people specially trained to deal with injuries to the face, mouth, and jaw. These people are Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons and the professionals who work with them. Their training and expertise uniquely qualifies them to treat facial trauma.

One of the most common and potentially serious injuries to the face is a broken bone. Whether the fracture occurs in the lower jaw, upper jaw, palate, cheekbones, eye socket, or a combination of these, this type of injury can affect sight, and the ability to breathe, speak, or swallow properly. Other injuries include, lacerations, abrasions, and broken teeth.

Treating fractures of the face is similar to treating fractures in other parts of the body. However, because of the complex and delicate nature of facial bone structure, special care must be taken to ensure proper healing and restored function of the affected area.

When a fracture occurs, the fractured bones must be lined up (reduced) and held in position long enough to permit them time to heal. This could require up to six or more weeks depending on a patient’s age, and the complexity of the fracture. In the case of extensive fractures, multiple incisions Facial Traumato expose the bones and a combination of wiring or plating techniques may be required to treat the injury. Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons with their special training and experience are uniquely qualified to treat such fractures.

Not every facial injury is extensive, but any facial injury can be more complex than it seems on the surface. For instance, if a patient experiences a moderate cut to the lip, one that requires stitches to repair. The placement of those stitches must be precise to produce an acceptable cosmetic result. Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons specialize in this type of repair, so their expertise can be invaluable in treating an injury of this type.

Snoring and Sleep Apnea

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People who snore loudly are often the target of bad jokes and middle of the night elbow thrusts; but snoring is no laughing matter. While loud disruptive snoring is at best a social problem that may strain relationships, for many men, women and even children, loud habitual snoring may signal a potentially life threatening disorder: obstructive sleep apnea, or OSA.

Snoring Is Not Necessarily Sleep Apnea

It is important to distinguish between snoring and OSA. Many people snore. It's estimated that approximately 30% to 50% of the US population snore at one time or another, some significantly. Everyone has heard stories of men and women whose snoring can be heard rooms away from where they are sleeping.

Snoring of this magnitude can cause several problems, including marital discord, sleep disturbances and waking episodes sometimes caused by one's own snoring. But, snoring does not always equal OSA; sometimes it is only a social inconvenience. Still, even a social inconvenience can require treatment, and there are several options available to chronic snorers.

Treatment options include:

Radio Frequency (RF) of the Soft Palate uses radio waves to shrink the tissue in the throat or tongue, thereby increasing the space in the throat and making airway obstruction less likely. Over the course of several treatments the inner tissue shrinks while the outer tissue remains unharmed. Several treatments may be required, but the long-term success of this procedure has not as yet been determined.

Laser-Assisted Uvulopalatalpharyngoplasty (LA-UPPP) is a surgical procedure that removes the uvula and surrounding tissue to open the airway behind the palate. This procedure is generally used to relieve snoring and can be performed in the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon's office with local or general anesthesia.

Identifying and Treating OSA

Unlike simple snoring, obstructive sleep apnea is a potentially life-threatening condition that requires medical attention. The risks of undiagnosed OSA include heart attack, stroke, irregular heartbeat, high blood pressure, heart disease and decreased libido. In addition, OSA causes daytime drowsiness that can result in accidents, lost productivity and interpersonal relationship problems. The symptoms may be mild, moderate or severe.

Sleep apnea is fairly common. One in five adults has at least mild sleep apnea and one in 15 adults has at least moderate sleep apnea. OSA also affects 1% to 3% of children. During sleep, the upper airway can be obstructed by excess tissue, large tonsils and/or a large tongue. Also contributing to the problem may be the airway muscles, which relax and collapse during sleep, nasal passages, and the position of the jaw.

The cessation of breathing, or "apnea," brought about by these factors initiates impulses from the brain to awaken the person just enough to restart the breathing process.This cycle repeats itself many times during the night and may result in sleep deprivation and a number of health-related problems. Sleep apnea is generally defined as the presence of more than 30 apneas during a seven hour sleep. In severe cases, periods of not breathing may last for as long as 60 to 90 seconds and may recur up to 500 times a night.

Those who have OSA are often unaware of their condition and think they sleep well. The symptoms that usually cause these individuals to seek help are daytime drowsiness or complaints of snoring and breathing cessations observed by a bed partner. Please see the list of symptoms in the sidebar.

Diagnosing Sleep Disorders

If you exhibit several OSA symptoms, it's important to visit the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon for a complete examination and an accurate diagnosis.

At your first visit, your doctor will take a medical history and perform a head and neck examination looking for problems that might contribute to sleep-related breathing problems. An interview with your bed partner or other household members about your sleeping and waking behavior may be in order. If the doctor suspects a sleep disorder, you will be referred to a sleep clinic, which will monitor your nighttime sleep patterns through a special test called polysomnography.

Polysomnography will require you to sleep at the clinic overnight while a video camera monitors your sleep pattern and gathers data about the number and length of each breathing cessation or other problems that disturb your sleep. Often a "split night" study is done during which a C-PAP (continuous positive airway pressure) device is used. During polysomnography, every effort is made to limit disturbances to your sleep.

Treating Sleep Apnea

Obstructive sleep apnea can be effectively treated. Depending on whether your OSA is mild, moderate or severe, your doctor will select the treatment that is best for you.

Behavior Modification - If you are diagnosed with mild sleep apnea, your doctor may suggest you employ the non-medical treatments recommended to reduce snoring: weight loss; avoiding alcohol, caffeine and heavy meals within two hours of bedtime; no sedatives; and a change of sleeping positions. In mild cases, these practical interventions may improve or even cure snoring and sleep apnea.

Oral Appliances - If you have mild to moderate sleep apnea, or are unable to use C-PAP, recent studies have shown that an oral appliance can be an effective first-line therapy. The oral appliance is a molded device that is placed in the mouth at night to hold the lower jaw and tongue forward. By bringing the jaw forward, the appliance elevates the soft palate or retains the tongue to keep it from falling back in the airway and blocking breathing. Although not as effective as the continuous positive airway pressure (C-PAP) systems, oral appliances are indicated for use in patients with mild to moderate OSA who prefer oral appliances, who do not respond to C-PAP, are not appropriate candidates for C-PAP, or who fail treatment attempts with C-PAP or behavioral changes.

Patients using an oral appliance should have regular follow-up office visits with their Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon to monitor compliance, to ensure the appliance is functioning correctly and to make sure their symptoms are not worsening.

C-PAP (Continuous Positive Airway Pressure) and Bi-PAP (Bi-Level) - A C-PAP device is an effective treatment for patients with moderate OSA and the first-line treatment for those diagnosed with severe sleep apnea.Through a specially fitted mask that fits over the patient's nose, the C-PAP's constant, prescribed flow of pressured air prevents the airway or throat from collapsing. In some cases a Bi-PAP device, which blows air at two different pressures, may be used.

While C-PAP and Bi-PAP devices keep the throat open and prevent snoring and interruptions in breathing, they only treat your condition and do not cure it. If you stop using the C-PAP or Bi-PAP, your symptoms will return. Although C-PAP and Bi-PAP are often the first treatments of choice, they may be difficult for some patients to accept and use. If you find you are unable to use these devices, do not discontinue their use without talking to your doctor.Your Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon can suggest other effective treatments.

Surgery for Sleep Apnea

Surgical intervention may be a viable alternative for some OSA patients; however, it is important to keep in mind that no surgical procedure is universally successful. Every patient has a different shaped nose and throat, so before surgery is considered your Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon will measure the airway at several points and check for any abnormal flow of air from the nose to lungs. Be assured, your doctor has considerable experience and the necessary training and skill to perform the following surgical procedures:

Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) - If the airway collapses at the soft palate, a UPPP may be helpful. UPPP is usually performed on patients who are unable to tolerate the C-PAP. The UPPP procedure shortens and stiffens the soft palate by partially removing the uvula and reducing the edge of the soft palate.

Hyoid Suspension - If collapse occurs at the tongue base, a hyoid suspension may be indicated. The hyoid bone is a U-shaped bone in the neck located above the level of the thyroid cartilage (Adam's apple) that has attachments to the muscles of the tongue as well as other muscles and soft tissues around the throat.The procedure secures the hyoid bone to the thyroid cartilage and helps to stabilize this region of the airway.

Genioglossus Advancement (GGA) - GGA was developed specifically to treat obstructive sleep apnea, and is designed to open the upper breathing passage. The procedure tightens the front tongue tendon; thereby, reducing the degree of tongue displacement into the throat. This operation is often performed in tandem with at least one other procedure such as the UPPP or hyoid suspension.

Maxillomandibular Advancement (MMA) - MMA is a procedure that surgically moves the upper and lower jaws forward. As the bones are surgically advanced, the soft tissues of the tongue and palate are also moved forward, again opening the upper airway. For some individuals, the MMA is the only technique that can create the necessary air passageway to resolve their OSA condition.

Consulting the Doctor

Sleep apnea is a serious condition and individuals with OSA may not be aware they have a problem. If someone close to you has spoken of your loud snoring and has noticed that you often wake up abruptly, gasping for air, you should consult Dr. Falcone.

Reprinted with permission from American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons.

Corrective Jaw Surgery

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Corrective jaw surgery is sometimes referred to as “surgical orthodontics”, but is commonly known as orthognathic surgery. The word orthognathic literally means straight jaws. It is derived from the Greek word orthos meaning straight and gnathos meaning jaws. Therefore, orthognathic surgery is performed to straighten or correct improper jaw alignment and aid in jaw function.

Just as your orthodontist corrects your crooked teeth with braces and other appliances, Dr. Falcone can correct poorly positioned jawbones and teeth with orthognathic surgery.

Many times, people are born with or develop problems with their jaws that cannot be corrected by braces alone. One or both of your jaws may grow too much or too little, resulting in speech difficulties, chewing problems, bite irregularities, breathing difficulty, and an unfavorable facial appearance. Also, problems with your bite can threaten the health of your teeth and gums. Your jaw joints (TMJ) can be affected too, causing pain and dysfunction.

If you have unequal jaw or facial bone growth, orthognathic surgery with other cosmetic maxillofacial surgery may be indicated.

Take a close look at yourself. Do you have any of the following conditions? 1. Protruding jaw (upper or lower) 2. Receding jaw or chin 3. Large jaw or chin 4. Cheekbone or nasal abnormality 5. “Gummy Smile” 6. “Long” facial appearance 7. “Short” upper lip 8. Open bite (A space between your upper and lower front or back teeth when you bite.) 9. Unbalanced facial or jaw appearance 10. Speech or breathing impairment 11. Difficulty in chewing or biting 12. Chronic jaw joint pain 13. Excessive tooth wear 14. Chronic mouth breathing 15. Chronic snoring and/or sleep apnea

If you do have any of these problems, orthognathic and maxillofacial cosmetic surgery can be used to correct them.

Many times, a team approach is necessary between Dr. Falcone and your orthodontist. First, your teeth are properly aligned with braces, then corrective jaw surgery is performed to place your jaws in their proper position. In addition, chin, nasal bone, cheekbone or other facial deformities can be corrected at the same time. Not only will your facial appearance be improved, but now your bite has been altered to allow you to chew, smile and speak with more confidence than ever before.

Dr. Falcone can determine if corrective jaw surgery and cosmetic maxillofacial surgery are right for you just by performing an examination and by taking some x-rays and photographs. Rarely, are other diagnostic measures necessary. Remember that unequal growth of your jaws can cause you a lot of trouble, so if you suspect a problem, see Dr. Falcone to have your jaws, face and bite examined. He will be available to answer any questions that you may have and propose a customized treatment plan to improve your jaw function and restore your facial balance and improve your appearance.

Cosmetic Surgery

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Cosmetic maxillofacial surgery is any procedure used to enhance, correct or repair any physical deformity or undesirable characteristic pertaining to the lips, jaws, mouth, nose, eyes, cheeks, and other portions of the face. This type of surgery can be helpful in repairing malformations caused by diseases, injury or trauma, burns, aging, birth defects or previous surgery. Cosmetic surgery also serves as a means to restore normal function and improve your appearance. It may also add to your self-confidence and self-esteem, but this is not our primary objective. It is important that you understand that the goal of cosmetic maxillofacial surgery is to improve your appearance, it will not give you a new face or a new life.

Dr. Falcone has had extensive training in facial cosmetic surgical procedures and is uniquely qualified to treat any facial deformity. He has received education in performing surgery on the soft and hard tissues of the face during his residency and his post-residency fellowship. Dr. Falcone understands the fine balance between facial appearance and function, due to his surgical and dental background. He also receives continuing education credits each year to provide you with the most advanced facial cosmetic procedures, as well as other oral and maxillofacial surgery procedures.

A decision to have cosmetic maxillofacial surgery is a personal one. It is crucial to discuss your individual concerns and expectations thoroughly with Dr. Falcone. You must proceed with realistic expectations and a good attitude, as your recovery will depend on it. Patience is also necessary on your part. Your final cosmetic result may not be apparent until many months after your surgery.

Remember that cosmetic maxillofacial surgery is usually considered an “elective” rather than a medically necessary procedure. It is usually not covered by your insurance plan, but since there is so much variety in insurance today, check with your carrier to determine if your surgery is a covered procedure.

Prior to any surgery, Dr. Falcone will take a thorough medical history and perform an extensive physical evaluation to see if you are indeed a candidate for surgery. One or more visits may be required to discuss your procedure, the expected results, changes in appearance, risks and complications as well as anesthetic choices.

Most times, cosmetic maxillofacial surgery can be performed right in Dr. Falcone’s office. Sometimes, it must be performed in a hospital setting. This will depend on the procedure as well as Dr.’s and your preference. Local anesthesia, intravenous sedation as well as general anesthesia may be used to perform these types of procedures.

Some of the types of cosmetic maxillofacial surgery available are as follows: 1. Nasal reconstruction (rhinoplasty or nose job) 2. Facelift (rhytidectomy) 3. Cosmetic surgery for the eyes (blepharoplasty, forehead/eyebrow lift) 4. Chin surgery (genioplasty) 5. Cheek implants or removal of fat around cheekbones to enhance this area 6. Facial and neck (cervical) liposuction 7. Treatment of facial wrinkling (chemical peel, laser skin resurfacing, dermabrasion injections and fillers) 8. Treatment of facial scarring 9. Lip augmentation

If you are concerned with your facial appearance and wish to have a consultation and examination, please contact our office at (570) 455-5889. Our concerned staff will help answer any questions you may have on cosmetic maxillofacial surgery procedures and schedule your appointment with Dr. Falcone. He will be happy to discuss the treatment alternatives available to you and formulate a personalized treatment plan.

Stem Cell Recovery

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Imagine a world where victims of spinal cord injuries can walk, where there are no shortages of organs for those in need of an organ transplant, where diabetes is no longer treated with insulin shots but cured by implanting insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells grown from the individual’s own stem cells. Such is the promise of stem cell based regenerative medicine as envisioned by both the NIH (National Institutes of Health) and the HHS (Department of Health and Human Services).

Both the NIH and HHS are committing significant resources to the field of regenerative medicine and both predict it will revolutionize medicine as we know it today, improving quality of life and reducing health care costs.

According to the HHS, “This revolutionary technology has the potential to develop therapies for previously untreatable diseases and conditions. Examples of diseases regenerative medicine can cure include: diabetes, heart disease, renal failure, osteoporosis and spinal cord injuries. Virtually any disease that results from malfunctioning, damaged, or failing tissues may be potentially cured through regenerative medicine therapies. Having these tissues available to treat sick patients creates the concept of tissues for life.” So promising is the technology that the US military is spending hundreds of millions of dollars through the AFIRM (Armed Forces Institute of Regenerative Medicine) initiative, to develop regenerative stem cell therapies to treat injured soldiers returning from battle.

So what is Regenerative Medicine? According to the NIH, “Regen- erative Medicine is the process of creating living, functional tissues to repair or replace organ function lost due to age, disease, damage or congenital defects. This field holds the promise of regenerating damaged tissues and organs in the body by stimulating previously irreparable organs to heal themselves. Regenerative medicine also empowers scientists to grow tissues and organs in the laboratory and safely implant them when the body cannot heal itself.” Simply put, regenerative medicine utilizes stem cells, the body’s own natural repair and maintenance mechanisms, to address disease and trauma.

Stem cells are unique in that they are the only cells in our body that can regenerate. Certain types of stem cells have the ability to ‘differentiate.’ This allows stem cells to turn into a broad range of specialized tissue types. This means that stem cells can regenerate organs, tissues, bones and much more. As a result, we are witnessing stem cell therapies being developed to treat disease and trauma such as Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, diabetes, MS, arthritis, heart disease, spinal cord injuries, joint replacement, genetic diseases and many more.

Did you know that there are powerful stem cells in your teeth? The stem cells that exist in teeth are very compelling for a number of reasons:

They are ‘plastic’ – Meaning they can differentiate into other types of tissue such as muscle, neurons, bone, organs, insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells, skin and cartilage to name a few. This means they could potentially be used to treat a wide range of disease and injury.

Virtually no chance of rejection - Saving your own stem cells from your teeth, otherwise known as your own autologous tissue, means that once they are reintroduced into the body during a treatment, they will not be rejected as foreign tissue as the body recognizes them as their own. Reintroducing your own tissue during treatment virtually eliminates the chance of rejection and the need for immunosuppressant drugs.

Non-controversial - Stem cells in teeth are ‘adult’ stem cells; they are non-embryonic stem cells and therefore do not have any of the moral and ethical controversies associated with embryonic stem cells.

Easy and convenient - Stem cells from teeth can be re- covered and banked conveniently and affordably during routine dental procedures.

It is important to note that stem cells age along with the individual. It’s one of the reasons we physically grow old. After we reach full adulthood, our stem cells fail to keep up with the degradation our bodies endure over time. Hence, the younger the stem cells, the better. That is why baby teeth are such a great source of stem cells. Recovering stem cells from baby teeth ensures the stem cells are young, strong and vital. Wisdom teeth and healthy teeth being extracted for orthodontic purposes from young adults also present excellent opportunities to recover stem cells.

The promise of regenerative medicine is not science fiction or decades away - it is happening today. We are witnessing organ transplants with organs built entirely from a person’s own stem cells. Recently, doctors replaced a woman’s cancerous windpipe with one grown from her own stem cells – not a donor’s. Why is this so important? Besides removing the uncertainty and stress related to finding a suitable organ donor, by using the patient’s own stem cells, doctors were able to eliminate the need for the patient to take anti-rejection drugs. Otherwise, she would have had to spend the rest of her life taking powerful immunosuppressant drugs which can have undesired side effects. Another recent example is the successful transplantation of bladders that are grown in a laboratory with the individual’s own stem cells.

In addition, heart tissue, bone, insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells and other tissues are being grown from stem cells. With the continued success of such procedures, personalized stem cell applications will become the new standard of treatment.

With StemSave, protecting your family’s future health by securing their stem cells today is easy and convenient. StemSave works with us to recover the teeth at the time of an extraction to assure the highest probability of stem cell viability. Simply register at www.StemSave.com and StemSave sends one of its patented transport kits to us prior to the planned procedure. At the time of the extraction, we will deposit the extracted teeth into the kit. The kit is then sealed and rushed to StemSave’s laboratories where the teeth are processed and the cells tested for viability. Upon positive viability, the cells are cryopreserved to be available for utilization in future personalized regenerative therapies.

To learn more about how you can secure your family’s future health by banking their stem cells, call our office today or visit www.StemSave.com.

Most procedures can be done safely and comfortably in our office. However, if your case is extensive or complicated, Dr. Falcone maintains staff privileges at Hazleton General Hospital.
We strive to provide you with the most advanced and up to date surgical procedures to treat all of your oral and maxillofacial surgery needs. Please feel free to navigate this web site to obtain further information about some of the specific procedures that we offer.

FALCONE ORAL & MAXILLOFACIAL SURGERY, P.C.
Medical Arts Complex
668 North Church Street
Suite 10
Hazleton, PA 18201

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Patient Information

Falcone Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, P. C. strives to offer our patients answers from a doctor you can trust. In addition to the patient Information below.

More Patient Info

Appointments

You have been referred for specialized care to an Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon. Our office will make every effort to make your visit with us a comfortable experience.

This time is reserved specifically for you. If by necessity, you must cancel your appointment for surgery, please notify us at least 24 hours in advance. Otherwise you will be billed for your missed appointment.

Please assist us be providing the following information at the time of your consultation. 1. Your surgical referral slip and any X-rays if applicable. 2. A list of medications you are presently taking 3. If you have medical or dental insurance, bring the necessary completed forms and insurance cards. This will save time and allow us to process any claims efficiently.

IMPORTANT: All patients under the age of 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or guardian.

The initial visit, with the exception of certain emergency cases, is for consultation only. This enables us to fully evaluate you and tailor your care to your specific needs.

A preoperative consultation and physical examination is mandatory for patients undergoing IV anesthesia for their surgery

You may reach us by calling (570) 455-5889.

Pre-appointment Forms

In an effort to make your appointment as smooth as possible, we provide our patients with the opportunity to fill out their forms prior to their appointment. This allows you to bypass the need to fill out the following forms in the office before your visit. Please print these documents and email them to nicole@drfalcone.com or return them upon visiting the office for your appointment. Feel free to call us with any questions at (570) 455-9714.

Notice of Privacy Practices

Patient Information

Medical History

Payment Authorization

OUR POLICY OF CARE AND PAYMENT:

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Our mission is to provide safe, comfortable and technologically advanced healthcare to all of our patients. We always strive to perform our jobs well, so you can leave our office with the utmost satisfaction.

Our staff will be happy to assist you with any insurance questions that might arise. We accept many insurance plans, however, plans differ tremendously. We do advise you to speak to us before your treatment so that no misunderstandings arise as to your benefits. Our courteous staff is always available to discuss your insurance coverage personally and to provide solutions for you. We will also submit and process you insurance claims.

Payment is due at the time of treatment. If this is not convenient for you, we have multiple payment options.

PAYMENT OPTIONS: 1. MasterCard, VISA, AMERICAN EXPRESS OR DISCOVER 2. Cash, Check, or Money Order 3. Debit or ATM cards 4. Monthly payments through Care Credit

PROVIDING OPTIMAL HEALTH CARE TO OUR PATIENTS IS THE PRIMARY GOAL OF OUR PRACTICE. HOWEVER, IDEAL TREATMENT CAN BE DIFFICULT TO AFFORD.

This is why we provide CareCredit, a monthly payment program that allows you to start your treatment today and spread out the payments over time. You can finance all or part of our treatment. It is especially ideal for co-payments, deductibles and treatments that are not covered by your insurance plan. It is all up to you to decide. Approval for monthly payments only takes a couple of minutes and we will be glad to process your application immediately. There is no cost to apply! Payments can be as low as three percent (3%) of your outstanding balance.

There is no down payment! WHEN YOU ARE APPROVED FOR CareCredit WE DO NOT REQUIRE PAYMENT TODAY.

Applying for CareCredit is simple and fast. There are no annual fees and you can use your card for future healthcare needs! In addition, by using CareCredit for our healthcare, you can leave your other major credit cards available for non-healthcare purchases and emergencies. If you need a low monthly payment, CareCredit is your option!

Notice of Privacy Practices for Protected Health Information

This notice describes how medical information about you may be used and disclosed
and how you can get access to this information. Please review it carefully!

With your consent, the practice is permitted by federal privacy laws to make uses and disclosures
of your health information for purposes of treatment, payment, and health care operations. Protected health information is the information we create and obtain in providing our services to you.

Such information may include documenting your symptoms, examination and test results, diagnoses, treatment and applying for future care or treatment.   It also includes billing documents for those services.

Example of uses of your health information for treatment purposes:

A nurse obtains treatment information about you and records it in a health record. During the course of your treatment, the doctor determines a need to consult with another specialist in the area.   The doctor will share the information with such a specialist and obtain input.

Example of use of your health information for payment purposes:

We submit a request for payment to your health insurance company. The health insurance company requests information from us regarding medical care given. We will provide information
to them about you and the care given.

Example of use of your Information for Health Care Operations:

We obtain services from your insurers or other business associates such as quality assessment, quality improvement, outcome evaluation, protocol and clinical guidelines development, training programs, credentialing, medical review, legal services and insurance.   We will share information
about you with such insurers or other business associates as necessary to obtain these services.

Your Health Information Rights -

The health record we maintain and billing records are the physical property of the practice.
The information in it, however, belongs to you. You have a right to: 1. Request a restriction on certain uses and disclosures of your health information by delivering the request in writing to our office. We are not required to grant the request but we will try to comply with any request granted; 2. Obtain a paper copy of the 'Notice of Privacy Practices' for Protected Health Information ("Notice") by making a request at our office; 3. Request that you be allowed to inspect and copy your health record and billing record - you may exercise this right by delivering the request in writing to our office; 4. Appeal a denial of access to your protected health information except in certain circumstances; 5. Request that your health care record be amended to correct incomplete or incorrect information by delivering a written request to our office; 6. File a statement of disagreement if your amendment is denied, and require that the request for amendment and any denial be attached in all future disclosures of your protected health information; 7. Obtain an accounting of disclosures of your health information as required to be maintained by law by delivering a written request to our office. An accounting will not include internal uses of information for treatment, payment or operations, disclosures made to you or made at your request, or disclosures made to family members or friends in the course of providing care; 8. Request that communication of your health information be made by alternative means or at an alternate location by delivering the request in writing to our office; and 9. Revoke authorizations that you made previously to use or disclose information except to the extent information or action has already been taken by delivering a written revocation to our office.

If you want to exercise any of the above rights, please contact Dr. Frank Falcone, Jr. (570) 455-5889,
in person or in writing, during normal hours. He will provide you with assistance on the steps to take to exercise your rights.

You have the right to review this Notice before signing the consent authorizing use and disclosure of your protected health information for treatment, payment, and health care operations purposes.

Our Responsibilities -

The practice is required to: Maintain the privacy of your health information as required by law; Provide you with a notice of our duties and privacy practices as to the information we collect and maintain about you; Abide by the terms of this Notice; Notify you if we cannot accommodate a requested restriction or request; and Accommodate your reasonable requests regarding methods to communicate health information to you.

We reserve the right to amend, change, or eliminate provisions in our privacy practices and access practices and to enact new provisions regarding the protected health information we maintain. If our information practices change, we will amend our Notice. You are entitled to receive a revised copy of the Notice by calling and requesting a copy of our "Notice" or by visiting our office and picking up a copy.

To Request Information or File a Complaint -

If you have questions, would like additional information, or want to report a problem regarding the handling of your information, you may contact Dr. Frank Falcone, Jr. (570) 455-5889.

Additionally, if you believe your privacy rights have been violated, you may file a written complaint at our office by delivering the written complaint to Dr. Frank Falcone, Jr. You may also file a complaint by mailing it or e-mailing it to the Secretary of Health and Human Services whose street address and e-mail address is The Public Ledger Building, 150 S. Independence Mall West, Philadelphia, PA 19106-3499, (215) 861-4633. 1. We cannot, and will not, require you to waive the right to file a complaint with the Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS) as a condition of receiving treatment from the practice. 2. We cannot, and will not retaliate against you for filing a complaint with the Secretary.
Other Disclosures and Uses -

Notification - Unless you object, we may use or disclose your protected health information to notify, or assist in notifying, a family member personal representative, or other person responsible for your care, about your location, and about your general condition, or your death.

Communication with Family - Using your best judgement, we may disclose to a family member, other relative, close personal friend, or any other person you identify, health information relevant to that person’s involvement in your care or in payment for such care if you do not object or in an emergency.

Food and Drug Administration (FDA) - We may disclose to the FDA your protected health information relating to adverse events with respect to products and product defects, or post-marketing surveillance information to enable product recalls, repairs, or replacements.

Workers Compensation - If you are seeking compensation through Workers Compensation, we may disclose your protected health information to the extent necessary to comply with laws relating to Workers Compensation.

Public Health - As required by law, we may disclose your protected health information to public health or legal authorities charged with preventing or controlling disease, injury, or disability.

Abuse & Neglect - We may disclose your protected health information to public authorities as allowed by law to report abuse or neglect.

Correctional Institutions - If you are an inmate of a correctional institution, we may disclose to the institution, or its agents, your protected health information necessary for your health and the health and safety of other individuals.

Law Enforcement - We may disclose your protected health information for law enforcement purposes as required by law, such as when required by a court order, or in cases involving felony prosecutions, or the extent an individual is in the custody of law enforcement.

Health Oversight - Federal law allows us to release your protected health information to appropriate health oversight agencies or for health oversight activities.

Judicial/Administrative Proceedings - We may disclose your protected health information in the course of any judicial or administrative proceeding as allowed or required by law, with your consent, or as directed by a proper court order.

Other Uses - Other uses and disclosures besides those identified in this Notice will be made only as otherwise authorized by law or with your written authorization and you may revoke the authorization as previously provided.

Website - If we maintain a website that provides information about our entity, this Notice will be on the website.

Research - We may disclose information to researchers when their research has been approved by an institutional review board that has reviewed the research proposal and established protocols to ensure the privacy of your protected health information.

Disaster Relief - We may use and disclose your protected health information to assist in disaster relief efforts.

Funeral Directors/Coroners - We may disclose your protected health information to funeral directors or coroners consistent with applicable law to allow them to carry out their duties.

Organ Procurement Organizations - Consistent with applicable law, we may disclose your protected health information to organ procurement organizations of other entities engaged in the procurement, banking or transplantation of organs for the purpose of tissue donation and transplant.

Marketing - We may contact you to provide you with information about treatment alternatives, or with information about other health-related benefits and services that may be of interest to you.

Fund Raising - We may contact you as part of a fund raising effort.

For Specialized Governmental Functions - We may disclose your protected health information for specialized government functions as authorized by law, such as to Armed Forces personnel, for national security purposes, or to public assistance program personnel.


Effective Date: 10/1/2002

Need a Ride?

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The Greater Hazleton Health Alliance Patient Shuttle Service is available to all Hazleton residents. It is a free service offered by Hazleton General Hospital to serve the area's patient transport- ation needs.

You no longer need to let a lack of transportation stop you from getting the care you need. To arrange transportation, simply call the shuttle service at (570) 501-4990 two weeks prior to your scheduled appointment.

History:

Since it was launched in July of 1997, the Greater Hazleton Health alliance's Patient Shuttle Service has become one of the most popular programs offered by our community hospital.

The initial need for this service was discovered through a community health needs assesment study conducted in 1995. Horizons for a Healthier Hazleton, a group of community leaders, provided input for the survey conducted by a consultant for Hazleton General Hospital. Often, it is very difficult for a patient to get a ride to the hospital or doctor's office without having to inconvenience a friend or family member for several hours. In many instances, elderly patients have no children living in the area who can take them to their appointment.

The Greater Hazleton Health Allicane has responded to this need by offering its free shuttle service.

FALCONE ORAL & MAXILLOFACIAL SURGERY, P.C.
Medical Arts Complex
668 North Church Street
Suite 10
Hazleton, PA 18201
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Surgical Instructions

Please be sure to read thoroughly the information sheets relating to your surgery preparation, precautions, and special instructions.
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One of the things that Dr. Falcone has mastered is the importance of making you aware of what to expect during surgery. This is im- portant to reduce your level of anxiety. The more you know and understand, the less you will have to worry.

A consultation visit is mandatory to review your individual needs and determine which type of anesthesia is preferred so that any anxiety that you have will be minimized.

At your initial consultation visit, Dr. Falcone will discuss your procedure, your medical and surgical history and your comfort level. Many times, a patient can have their procedures performed using local anesthesia to "numb” the area. Other times, you may wish to have some type of sedative anesthesia to calm you or to make you virtually unaware of your surgery. Your choice of anesthesia is a personal one and should be made only after a thorough and informative consultation with Dr. Falcone.

Also, at your consultation visit you will be given special instructions to prepare for your surgery. These instructions are applicable for procedures performed with oral sedation, nitrous oxide, intravenous sedation and general anesthesia.

Dr. Falcone and his staff truly share your concern for your well being. They have the knowledge and expertise to make your surgical and anesthetic experience pleasant, safe and extremely comfortable. We are always happy to answer any questions that you might have regarding your surgery and anesthesia.

When you arrive at Dr. Falcone’s office for your surgery and anesthesia, it is similar to having surgery performed in a hospital setting and is user friendly. Our surgery suite and recovery area has all of the same equipment used in the hospital operating room. Prior to your surgery, Dr. Falcone will review your treatment plan. You will be escorted to our surgical suite where you will be prepared for surgery.

Our nurses and assistants will place a few monitors to measure your blood pressure, pulse, respirations, amount of expired carbon dioxide, amount of oxygen in your blood as well as your heart rhythm. Next, our nurse anesthetist, Ms. Rocanelli or Dr. Falcone will place a catheter in your vein to establish intravenous access. The medications given through the intravenous line will make you relax or even fall asleep.

The next thing you know is that your procedure has been completed. The benefit of intravenous medications is that there is less stress, anxiety and awareness during your procedure. This is because the medications that we use cause partial and in most cases total amnesia (forgetfulness). Therefore, you will have reduced perception to noise and other activities throughout your surgery. It is important to note that you will still be given a local anesthetic to “numb” your surgical site after you have been sedated. Therefore, you will not have pain during and after your sedative procedure has been completed.

Once your surgical procedure has been completed, you will be brought to our recovery area. When you are able to drink fluids and walk with your escort you are almost ready to leave. Our recovery room staff will give you and your escort post-operative instructions, which should be followed. Dr. Falcone will prescribe medications to make you comfortable once you leave the office and control your discomfort and swelling for the days following your surgery.

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Our goal is to provide every patient with high-quality oral and maxillofacial surgery care. We wish to make your visit as safe and comfortable as possible. Dr. Falcone is not only a specialist in treating problems of the mouth, teeth and jaws, but also is experienced in dealing with the control of pain and anxiety. Modern technology makes it manageable to perform complicated surgical procedures in the office with little or no discomfort.

During his residency and fellowship, Dr. Falcone received extensive training in the medical and dental aspects of anesthesia. He holds a special permit, which is required to administer anesthesia in the state of Pennsylvania. In addition, his office has been inspected and has state of the art monitoring equipment.

Dr. Falcone has the ability to handle emergency situations as well as having specific emergency medications and equipment that is mandatory for safe anesthesia delivery. Dr. Falcone and his staff are trained in CPR, Advanced Cardiac Life Support and Pediatric Advanced Life Support.

In our effort to make your surgical experience as pleasant and stress free as possible, as well as to maintain the highest level of safety, we employ a certified registered nurse anesthetist to assist Dr. Falcone in the delivery of anesthesia. Linda Rocanelli, CRNA has over 20 years of anesthesia expertise and has given thousands of intravenous sedations and general anesthetics over that time period. She is also employed at Hazleton General Hospital as a staff nurse anesthetist and maintains the penultimate standard of care for office outpatient anesthesia.

Anesthesia in our office as an outpatient can take place in many different forms. 1. Local Anesthesia (Novocaine) 2. Local Anesthesia with oral sedation (Oral Valium Sedation) 3. Local Anesthesia with Nitrous Oxide (Laughing Gas) 4. Local Anesthesia with Intravenous Sedation (Conscious Sedation, Deep Sedation, Twilight Sleep 5. General Anesthesia (Fully Asleep with a breathing tube) can also be performed but is not usually necessary. If general anesthesia is required for your procedure, it may be done in a hospital setting as an outpatient or inpatient depending on your personal circumstances. Dr. Falcone and his staff have the knowledge and expertise to make your surgical and anesthetic experience pleasant, safe and extremely comfortable and are always happy to answer any questions that you might have.

To help you prepare for your surgery, please review these instructions that are applicable for procedures performed with oral sedation, nitrous oxide, intravenous sedation, and general anesthesia. 1. It is important that you take nothing by mouth (this includes food, water, soda, coffee, milk, juices, etc.) for a period of eight (8) hours prior to your surgery. 2. Do not drink alcoholic beverages twelve (12) hours prior to your surgery. 3. Please take all of your necessary prescribed medications with a sip of water prior to your surgery unless specifically told not to do so by Dr. Falcone. 4. Wear warm comfortable clothing with loose fitting sleeves. 5. Do not wear jewelry. 6. Remove contact lenses. 7. A responsible adult must accompany you and remain in our office during your surgery. They must also be able to drive you home. Do not plan to drive an automobile or operate machinery for twenty-four (24) hours after your surgery. Your escort must not have small children accompanying them on the day of your surgery; they are to take care of you only. 8. An adult should remain with the patient for twenty-four (24) hours after surgery and anesthesia. 9. Please bring any instructions or x-rays from your referring doctor. 10. Please bring your unsigned surgical and anesthesia consent forms with you the day of your surgery. 11. You will need to be off from school or work for at least one or two days after oral surgery and anesthesia. 12. Please follow the written post-operative instructions that are given to you. Have your prescriptions filled and take them as directed by Dr. Falcone. 13. Patients with acrylic nails please remove at least one nail from your left hand preferably. Feel free to contact our office at (570)455-5889 if you have any questions regarding your surgery and anesthesia.

PLEASE READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS CAREFULLY. Sometimes the after-effects of oral surgery are quite minimal, so not all of the instructions may apply. Common sense will often dictate what you should do. However, when in doubt follow these guidelines or call our office for clarification at (570) 455-5889.

DAY OF SURGERY

FIRST HOUR Bite down gently but firmly on the gauze packs that have been placed over the surgical areas, making sure they remain in place. Do not change them for the first hour unless the bleeding is not controlled. The packs may be gently removed after one hour. If active bleeding persists, place enough new gauze to obtain pressure over the surgical site for another 30 minutes. It is best to moisten the gauze with tap water and loosely fluff for more comfortable positioning. EXERCISE CARE Do not disturb the surgical area today. DO NOT SPIT. DO NOT RINSE. DO NOT PROBE the area with any objects. You may brush your teeth gently after 24 hours. PLEASE DO NOT SMOKE for at least 7 days, since this is very detrimental to healing and may cause a dry socket. OOZING Intermittent bleeding or oozing overnight and for up to 24 hours is normal. Severe Bleeding may be controlled by placing fresh gauze over the areas and biting on the gauze for 30-60 minutes at a time. PERSISTENT BLEEDING Bleeding should never be severe. If so, it usually means that the packs are being clenched between teeth only and are not exerting pressure on the surgical areas. Try repositioning the packs. If bleeding persists or becomes heavy you may substitute a tea bag (soaked in very hot water, squeezed damp-dry and wrapped in a moist gauze) for 20 or 30 minutes. If bleeding remains uncontrolled, please call our office. SWELLING Swelling is often associated with oral surgery. It can be minimized by using a cold pack, ice bag or a bag of frozen peas wrapped in a towel and applied firmly to the cheek adjacent to the surgical area. This should be applied twenty minutes on and twenty minutes off during the first 12 to 24 hours after surgery. If you have been prescribed medicine for the control of swelling, be sure to take it as directed. After 24 hours, it is usually best to switch from ice to moist heat to the same areas. PAIN Unfortunately most oral surgery is accompanied by some degree of discomfort. You will usually have a prescription for pain medication. If you take the first pill before the anesthetic has worn off, you should be able to manage any discomfort better. Some patients find that stronger pain medicine causes nausea, but if you precede each pain pill with a small amount of food, chances for nausea will be reduced. The effects of pain medications vary widely among individuals. If you do not achieve adequate relief at first, you may supplement each pain pill with an analgesic such as aspirin or ibuprofen. Some patients may even require two of the pain pills at one time. Remember that the most severe pain is usually within six hours after the local anesthetic wears off; after that your need for medicine should lessen. If you find you are taking large amounts of pain medicine at frequent intervals, please call our office. If you anticipate needing more prescription medication for the weekend, you must call for a refill during weekday business hours. NAUSEA Nausea is not uncommon after surgery. Sometimes pain medications are the cause. Nausea can be reduced by preceding each pain pill with a small amount of soft food, and taking the pill with a large volume of water. Try to keep taking clear fluids and minimize dosing of pain medications, but call us if you do not feel better. Classic Coca Cola may help with nausea. DIET Eat any nourishing food that can be taken with comfort. Avoid extremely hot foods. Do not use a straw for the first few days after surgery. It is sometimes advisable, but not absolutely required, to confine the first day’s intake to liquids or pureed foods (soups, puddings, yogurt, milk shakes, etc.) It is best to avoid foods like nuts, sunflower seeds, popcorn, etc., which may get lodged in the socket areas. Over the next several days you may gradually progress to solid foods. It is important not to skip meals! If you take nourishment regularly you will feel better, gain strength, have less discomfort and heal faster. If you are a diabetic, maintain your normal eating habits or follow instructions given by your doctor. SHARP EDGES If you feel something hard or sharp edges in the surgical areas, it is likely you are feeling the bony walls which once supported the extracted teeth. Occasionally small slivers of bone may work themselves out during the first week or two after surgery. They are not pieces of tooth and, if necessary, we will remove them. Please call the office if your are concerned.

INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE SECOND AND THIRD DAYS

MOUTH RINSES Keeping your mouth clean after surgery is essential. Use 1/4 teaspoon of salt dissolved in an 8 ounce glass of warm water and gently rinse with portions of the solution, taking five minutes to use the entire glassful. Repeat as often as you like, but at least two or three times daily for the next 5 days. BRUSHING Begin your normal oral hygiene routine as soon as possible after surgery. In fact, gentle brushing of the surgery site should begin approximately 72 hours from the time of your extraction. Soreness and swelling may not permit vigorous brushing, but please make every effort to clean your teeth within the bounds of comfort. HOT APPLICATIONS You may apply warm compresses to the skin over the areas of swelling (hot water bottle, hot moist towels, heating pad) for 20 minutes on and 20 minutes off to help soothe tender areas. This will also help decrease swelling and stiffness. SYRINGE If you were given an irrigating syringe at your surgical visit, start using it the fifth to seventh day after surgery to keep sockets clean. Fill it with warm water and irrigate any open sockets gently, especially after eating. DRY SOCKETS Normal healing after tooth extraction should be as follows: The first day of surgery is usually the most uncomfortable and there is some degree of swelling and stiffness. The second day you will usually be far more comfortable and, although still swollen, you can usually begin a more substantial diet. From the third day on GRADUAL, STEADY IMPROVEMENT should mark the remainder of the post-operative course. If a DRY SOCKET occurs (loss of blood clot from socket, usually on the 3rd to 5th day) there is a noticeable, distinct, persistent throbbing pain in the jaw, often radiating toward the ear and forward along the jaw to cause other teeth to ache. If you do not see steady improvement during the first few days after surgery, don’t suffer needlessly. Call the office and report symptoms so you can be seen as soon as possible.

It is our desire that your recovery be as smooth and pleasant as possible. Following these instructions will assist you, but if you have questions about your progress, please call the office where you had surgery. A 24-hour answering service is available to contact the doctor on call after hours. Calling during office hours will afford a faster response to your question or concern. PLEASE NOTE: telephone calls for narcotic (pain killer) prescription renewal are ONLY accepted during office hours.

1. Please take your antibiotics as prescribed by Dr. Falcone. 2. Rinse with salt water every two (2) hours. 3. Place warm packs on the infection site every 20 minutes. 4. Do your mouth opening exercises. 5. Swelling may increase slightly due to surgical manipulation today and tomorrow. 6. Call Dr. Falcone if you have any questions at (570) 455-5889

1. Gentle pressure with moist gauze over surgery site for 4-6 hours. 2. Ice 20 minutes on, 20 minutes off for 24 hours. 3. Liquid diet for 24 hours. 4. Puree diet for 2 weeks. 5. Light physical activity for 2 weeks following surgery. 6. If additional post-operative bleeding occurs – apply gentle pressure with moist gauze at surgical site. 7. Expect significant swelling at the surgical sites. 8. Do not brush over surgery area for 2 weeks. 9. Use Ultra soft tooth brush over surgical area after 2 weeks of healing. 10. Do not chew hard foods in the surgical area for 6 weeks following surgery. 11. Do not be alarmed if delayed bleeding from the surgical site is seen 2-3 weeks after surgery. This is to be expected. Hold moist gauze over the area for 30-45 minutes with pressure and bleeding should stop.

Because of the close relationship between your upper back teeth and the sinus, a communication hole between the sinus and mouth sometimes results from surgery. That complication has occurred in your case, which often heals slowly and with difficulty. Certain precautions will assist healing and we ask that you faithfully follow these instructions:
1. Do not smoke. 2. Do not spit, rinse, or drink fluids with a straw. Twenty-four (24) hours after completion of your surgery, gentle salt water swishes may be used. 3. Do not strain on toilet. 4. No heavy lifting. 5. Bleeding from nose is not uncommon for several days after surgery. 6. Do not forcefully blow your nose for at least two weeks, even though your sinus may feel “stuffy” or there may be some nasal drainage. Pinch it with a tissue, only. 7. Try not to sneeze, it will cause undesirable sinus pressure. If you need to sneeze, sneeze with your mouth open. 8. Do not stifle a yawn. 9. It is important to take medications as prescribed. 10. Eat only soft foods for several days, always trying to chew on the opposite side of your mouth. 11. If you have questions, please call the office at (570) 455-5889.
Please keep our office advised of any changes in your condition, especially if drainage or pain increases. It is important that you keep all future appointments until healing is completed.

FALCONE ORAL & MAXILLOFACIAL SURGERY, P.C.
Medical Arts Complex
668 North Church Street
Suite 10
Hazleton, PA 18201
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Doctor Referrals

Thank you for visiting our website. To refer your patient to Falcone Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, P. C.. please download our Patient Referral Form. We look forward to establishing a lasting and mutually beneficial relationship with our referring dentists and physicians.

FALCONE ORAL & MAXILLOFACIAL SURGERY, P.C.
Medical Arts Complex
668 North Church Street
Suite 10
Hazleton, PA 18201

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Payment

OUR POLICY OF CARE AND PAYMENT: Image
Our mission is to provide safe, comfortable and technologically advanced healthcare to all of our patients. We always strive to perform our jobs well, so you can leave our office with the utmost satisfaction.
Our staff will be happy to assist you with any insurance questions that might arise. We accept many insurance plans, however, plans differ tremendously. We do advise you to speak to us before your treatment so that no misunderstandings arise as to your benefits. Our courteous staff is always available to discuss your insurance coverage personally and to provide solutions for you. We will also submit and process you insurance claims.
Payment is due at the time of treatment. If this is not convenient for you, we have multiple payment options.
PAYMENT OPTIONS:
1. MasterCard, VISA, AMERICAN EXPRESS OR DISCOVER 2. Cash, Check, or Money Order 3. Debit or ATM cards 4. Monthly payments through Care Credit
PROVIDING OPTIMAL HEALTH CARE TO OUR PATIENTS IS THE PRIMARY GOAL OF OUR PRACTICE. HOWEVER, IDEAL TREATMENT CAN BE DIFFICULT TO AFFORD.
This is why we provide CareCredit, a monthly payment program that allows you to start your treatment today and spread out the payments over time. You can finance all or part of our treatment. It is especially ideal for co-payments, deductibles and treatments that are not covered by your insurance plan. It is all up to you to decide. Approval for monthly payments only takes a couple of minutes and we will be glad to process your application immediately. There is no cost to apply! Payments can be as low as three percent (3%) of your outstanding balance.
There is no down payment! WHEN YOU ARE APPROVED FOR CareCredit WE DO NOT REQUIRE PAYMENT TODAY.
Applying for CareCredit is simple and fast. There are no annual fees and you can use your card for future healthcare needs! In addition, by using CareCredit for our healthcare, you can leave your other major credit cards available for non-healthcare purchases and emergencies. If you need a low monthly payment, CareCredit is your option!
FALCONE ORAL & MAXILLOFACIAL SURGERY, P.C.
Medical Arts Complex
668 North Church Street
Suite 10
Hazleton, PA 18201

Directions to Falcone OMS

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FALCONE ORAL & MAXILLOFACIAL SURGERY, P.C.
Medical Arts Complex
668 North Church Street
Suite 10
Hazleton, PA 18201


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Contact Us

FALCONE ORAL & MAXILLOFACIAL SURGERY, P.C.
Medical Arts Complex
668 North Church Street
Suite 10
Hazleton, PA 18201
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